Sign in
Download Opera News App

 

 

What you should know about Contraceptive Implant

A contraceptive implant is a small rod - about the size of a matchstick. The implant contains a progestogen hormone which provides contraception without you having to take a daily pill. The rod is put under the skin on your arm.

How is the contraceptive implant put in?

The contraceptive implant is about the size of a matchstick and is placed under the skin of the inner side of your upper arm.

  • An injection of local anaesthetic is used to numb the skin.
  • A special device is used to place the implant under the skin. The wound is dressed and will soon heal just like any other small cut.
  • The area around the implant may be bruised and tender for a few days.
  • Once it has healed, knocking the implant will not do it, or you, any harm.
  • You do not need to have an internal vaginal examination or a genital examination to have an implant.


Is there anyone who should not have a contraceptive implant?

Most women can have an implant fitted but there are a few exceptions. You should not have a contraceptive implant put in if you think you might be pregnant, or if you don't want to use a contraceptive method that might affect your periods.

You also should not use the contraceptive implant if:

  • You are taking medicines which might interfere with the implant.
  • You have heart or liver disease.
  • You have had breast cancer in the previous five years.
  • You are currently experiencing unexplained vaginal bleeding.
  • You have a hereditary blood disorder called porphyria.

There are some conditions which, if you have them, mean that you could use the contraceptive implant, but a different method might be more suitable for you. These include:

  • You are going to have major surgery with prolonged immobilisation.
  • You have an increased risk of blood clots in the veins due to antiphospholipid syndrome, antithrombin deficiency or factor V Leiden.
  • You have previously had a deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism.
  • You have migraines.
  • You have systemic lupus erythematosus.
  • You have gene mutations associated with breast cancer - for example, BRCA1.
  • You have cervical cancer.
  • You have experienced a stroke, angina or heart attack.
  • You have several risk factors for heart disease, such as smoking, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, diabetes.
  • You have had jaundice or itching caused by previous use of a hormonal contraceptive.

Content created and supplied by: MasterEric (via Opera News )

Contraceptive Implant

COMMENTS

Load app to read more comments