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Five Books You Should Read Before You Turn 35

Finishing school, starting a career, making new friends, moving cities a lot happens before you’re 30. The books below cover stories about navigating life as a new adult, as well as a few classics that you definitely should have under your belt before the next life stage. How many of the below books have you read?

1.Tough Never Last But Tough People Do By Robert Schuller.

Dr. Schuller shows you how to build a positive self-image, no matter what your problem. Whether it's unemployment, poor health, loneliness, fear or anything else that blocks your success, you can turn your negative into a positive. No matter how tough times get, you have the potential to achieve the best of life.

2. Predictably irrational by Dan Ariely.

It is a scientific but imminently readable and decidedly insightful look into why we do what we do every day and why, even though we know better we may never change.

3. The Millionaire Next Door by Tomas J Stanly.

The implication of The Millionaire Next Door is that nearly anybody with a steady job can amass a tidy fortune.

The kind of information that could lift the economic prospects of individuals more than any government policy.The Millionaire Next Door has a theme that I think rings very true. Hey, I can do it. You can do it too.

4. You Can Negotiate Anything by Herb Cohen.

Talks about the three crucial steps to success

• Identifying the other side’s negotiating style and how to deal with it.

• The win-win technique

• Using time to your advantage

• The power of persistence, persuasion, and attitude

• The art of the telephone negotiation, and much more.

Power is based upon perception if you think you’ve got it then you’ve got it.

5. Seven Habits of highly effective people by Stephen Covey.

Presents a holistic, integrated, principle-centered approach for solving personal and professional problems. With penetrating insights and pointed anecdotes, Covey reveals a step-by-step pathway for living with fairness, integrity, service, and human dignity--principles that give us the security to adapt to change and the wisdom and power to take advantage of the opportunities that change creates.

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Robert Schuller

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